3 Ways Septic System Maintenance Can Save You Money

  • By Rachel Kline
  • 24 Oct, 2017
When it comes to your septic system, “out of sight out of mind” is never a good philosophy. In fact, whether there are 2 people in your family or 10, the only way to keep things running smoothly is to schedule routine pumping and system maintenance. If your system is overdue for routine cleaning, give us a call today. And keep reading to learn how regular pumping can save you money in the long run.

1. Regular septic maintenance helps prevent backups.
The last thing you want is a septic backup. Not only are they messy, they can cost you A LOT of money. If a pumper has to come out on the weekend or after-hours due to a backup (that could have been prevented) you can expect a hefty bill. But the good news is, regular septic pumping can help prevent backups from ever happening. So pay attention to your township requirements and make sure you follow pumping guidelines for your area.

2. Routine pumping can extend the life of your septic system.
The most common reason septic systems go bad is due to neglect. Regular pumping is essential to keep things flushing smoothly and the only way to ensure your system is working properly. A technician can check your pipes and baffles to make sure all components are doing their jobs and make any needed repairs.

3. Regular maintenance can keep your septic tank healthy.
Your septic tank contains a balance of liquids and solids that are broken down by “healthy” bacteria. Over time, antibacterial products and cleaners can disrupt this balance, causing solids to build up. Regular pumping and the use of a septic system additive like Bio-Active can help keep your system healthy and restore the balance of “healthy” bacteria.

If your septic system could use a clean-out or you’re not sure when your tank was last emptied, contact us today. We can look up your address and inform you of your township guidelines. For more about septic maintenance be sure to visit our FAQ page.

The John Kline Septic Poop Scoop

By Rachel Kline 25 Oct, 2017
Not only is a septic system additive part of a smart routine maintenance plan, it offers a variety of benefits that can save you money in the long run! Want to know how? Keep reading to see why a product like Bio-Active should be in every septic system owner’s home. Or contact us today to learn more.

  1. A septic system additive like Bio-Active can help keep your system healthy. If you regularly use anti-bacterial products or flush harsh chemicals down the drain, you may be destroying the “healthy” bacteria needed to break down solids and process waste. An additive contains the right kind of bacteria to help restore balance and keep your tank functioning properly.
  2. Septic additives can help prevent backups. If your septic system has a history of backups or problems, an additive like Bio-Active can help keep things flushing smoothly. By regulating your tank’s bacteria levels, additives break down solids and waste so your tank drains properly and is easy to pump every 3 years. 
  3. A septic system additive can extend the life of your septic system. If your system is old or you’re not sure how often it was pumped by previous owners, an additive is a cost efficient part of any routine maintenance plan. Bio-Active can restore the balance in your septic tank so it can continue functioning properly for years to come. 
  4. A septic additive can save you money. That’s right – keeping your system healthy with a product like Bio-Active can save you money on service and repairs. When your system is working as it should a backup is unlikely and you won’t be charged additional fees for heavy solids disposal during your regular pumping. 

If you’d like to learn more about septic system maintenance, check out our frequently asked questions page. Or better yet, contact us today to schedule your septic pumping and claim your year’s supply of Bio-Active septic additive.
By Rachel Kline 24 Oct, 2017
When it comes to your septic system, “out of sight out of mind” is never a good philosophy. In fact, whether there are 2 people in your family or 10, the only way to keep things running smoothly is to schedule routine pumping and system maintenance. If your system is overdue for routine cleaning, give us a call today. And keep reading to learn how regular pumping can save you money in the long run.

1. Regular septic maintenance helps prevent backups.
The last thing you want is a septic backup. Not only are they messy, they can cost you A LOT of money. If a pumper has to come out on the weekend or after-hours due to a backup (that could have been prevented) you can expect a hefty bill. But the good news is, regular septic pumping can help prevent backups from ever happening. So pay attention to your township requirements and make sure you follow pumping guidelines for your area.

2. Routine pumping can extend the life of your septic system.
The most common reason septic systems go bad is due to neglect. Regular pumping is essential to keep things flushing smoothly and the only way to ensure your system is working properly. A technician can check your pipes and baffles to make sure all components are doing their jobs and make any needed repairs.

3. Regular maintenance can keep your septic tank healthy.
Your septic tank contains a balance of liquids and solids that are broken down by “healthy” bacteria. Over time, antibacterial products and cleaners can disrupt this balance, causing solids to build up. Regular pumping and the use of a septic system additive like Bio-Active can help keep your system healthy and restore the balance of “healthy” bacteria.

If your septic system could use a clean-out or you’re not sure when your tank was last emptied, contact us today. We can look up your address and inform you of your township guidelines. For more about septic maintenance be sure to visit our FAQ page.
By Rachel Kline 10 Jul, 2017
The most common question we receive from homeowners is how often you should have your septic tank pumped.  While you may be hoping for a one size fits all answer, the truth is, it all depends on your tank size and the number of people using the system. There are other factors that can determine your pumping frequency as well - things like the age of your septic system, whether or not you have a garbage disposal, and your average water consumption.

A basic rule of thumb is to have your septic tank emptied every 2-3 years. NEVER go more than 5 years, regardless of your tank size or family makeup. It's also important to think about what kind of things you're flushing on a regular basis... When you have a septic system remember that there's no such thing as a "flushable" wipe! And always buy septic safe toilet paper. For more information on septic tank maintenance and what not to flush, click here .

Most townships require pumping every 2-4 years, so if you live in a township with a pumping ordinance you'll receive a notice in the mail when you're due to be pumped. If not, mark your calendar and use the chart below to determine how often you should have your septic tank emptied. Once we pump your septic tank we'll make a note of our recommendations and we can give you a reminder call when it's time to be pumped again.

If you're not sure of your septic tank size, here's an easy way to make an educated guess - Most septic tanks are based on the number of bedrooms in your home. If your home has 3 bedrooms, you most likely have a 1000 gallon tank; 4-5 bedrooms is typically a 1500 gallon tank. Older homes have smaller septic tanks so if your home was built prior to the 1980's you may need to have your tank emptied more often.

If you're not sure when your septic tank was last pumped, it's a good idea to have it emptied and inspected to prevent a backup and ensure it's functioning properly. After you have your septic tank pumped you won't need to do it again for 2-4 years. Just remember, the two biggest factors that determine your pumping frequency are...

1. How many gallons your septic tank holds
2. How many people are in your household

Use this simple chart to determine how often your tank should be pumped and give us a call to get started! We're happy to inspect your tank and drainfield and make any recommendations to keep things flushing smoothly. 

By Rachel Kline 09 Jun, 2017

A backed up toilet, sink or shower can be a real pain. But determining who to call can be an even bigger headache. Don't wait until you have an emergency to learn the basics of septic system maintenance! Get the facts.

The easiest way to know if your problem is septic or plumbing related is to count the number of fixtures backing up. If your kitchen sink is the only fixture clogged, you can call a plumber to snake the drain or get to the root of the problem. If you notice that all of your sinks are draining slowly, however, you most likely have a septic backup. Additionally, you can determine it’s most likely a septic system issue if the fixtures backing up are the ones closest to the septic system, such as those on the ground level or in the basement.

Here are more clues your problem is septic related:

  • Do a quick survey of your yard. If you notice a sewage odor or the area above your septic tank feels soggy, you’ve probably got a septic backup.
  • Check your calendar. If it’s been more than 2-3 years since you had your septic tank pumped and your fixtures are draining slowly, you most likely have a problem for a septic pumper – not a plumber.
  • Take a listen to your pipes. If you hear a gurgling sound or notice a sewage odor, it’s most likely a septic problem.
  • Think about your water usage. If you’ve been flushing paper towels or wipes you may have created a clog. To find the location of the clog, locate your septic cleanout pipe (a short PVC pipe located between the house and the septic tank that sticks out of the ground or is flush with it, and has a threaded, removable cap). If there is no standing water in the bottom, then the problem is a clog between the house and the cleanout, so you should call a plumber. But standing water in the main drain pipe at the bottom of the cleanout riser indicates that you have either an overflowing septic tank or a clog between the cleanout and the tank, so call a septic pumper!

By Rachel Kline 13 Mar, 2017

We’ve been in the septic business for over 60 years and we’ve dealt with tons of backups – the most common thing we find when we’re looking for the cause of the clog or backup, is flushable wipes! Yes, “flushable” wipes. Don’t let the labels fool you… There is no such thing as a “flushable” wipe when you have a septic system.

Unlike toilet paper that dissolves quickly as soon as it gets wet, baby wipes, cleaning wipes and makeup removing wipes are durable and can take years to break down and dissolve. Don’t believe us? Watch this video.

More Posts
Share by: